Monday, June 19, 2017

what will schools look like in 50 years time?

You have all see the same ppt slides. A photo of a classroom circa 1900 or earlier side by side of a photo of a contemporary classroom (especially in the post-school sector). Both will show pretty much the same arrangement of desks, facing a board and a teacher.

In this article, posted last year on the Australian Business insider, Jonathan Rochelle who is product manager for Google Apps for Education, provides some insight and direction.

The headliners in the article are - collaboration will be the norm, leveraging off 'machine learning' to provide for differentiated learning opportunities and the importance of teachers to lead.

So, the apps availed through Google, are developed to enhance collaborative learning at all levels - early childhood through to tertiary and lifelong learning. Learning analytics require better understanding by teachers, especially to use information on individual student's learning to help them proceed through individualised learning pathways, and teachers need to be enabled to learn how to best use technology to enhance learning.

The two products promoted on Rochelle's website are Jamboard and GSuite for education

Jamboard is part of the overall Gsuite. US$4999 provides 1 display, 2 stylii, a eraser and wallmount. There is a US$600 annual support fee. Therefore, the product is pitched at the corporate market and an alternative to other types of smartboards currently on the market.

Gsuite for education is free and includes core services for organising class activities etc. through 'classroom', sort of a learning management system, gmail, google drive, calendar, vault - which archives emails and charts, sharing of docs, sheets, forms, slides and sites and google hangouts for video conferencing.

There is a version for higher education with case studies of universities who have adopted Gsuite and an emphasis on security plus links to the Google research tools.




Wednesday, June 14, 2017

SEED - Sharing Experience in Educational Design - Ara tutors presenting teaching practice


Bernadette Muir on ‘Design Jam’. On project-based learning in architecture to assist students to complete authentic learning project with vertical integration of the students from all 3 years of the Architecture degree.
Revolves around the living building challenge – whereby sustainable buildings are designed. Small one day event whereby students have to find solutions based on relationships between the place, availability of energy and water. Industry experts and people working in the sustainability area were invited to support the student teams. Provided rationale, details and feedback from students. Students appreciated the authenticity of the project and the experience provided them with the opportunity to learn not only from the experts and tutors, but from each other. Also important to follow up beyond. Third year students now build a scale model of an exemplar contemporary timber building and then present the feature as if they were the architect. Students also visit recently constructed buildings in Christchurch to connect theory to practice.

Cheryl Stokes on ‘To Kahoot or not to Kahoot’. Provided a practitioner’s point of view and how she uses the app to engage students. Cheryl has always used a series of apps to help students learn. Ran a Kahoot to show examples. Provided rationale and learning advantages for using from both tutor and student perspectives. Also detailed the various ways Kahoot used, their advantages and disadvantages. Important to reinforce the learning that has occurred while students use Kahoot. Important to help students become aware of the learning potential of using Kahoot, so they are able to leverage off the learning achieved.



Monday, June 12, 2017

Sensemaking: the power of the humanities in the age of the algorithm - book overview

Worked through a short book last weekend, which was wet and non-conducive to outdoor activities of any kind.

The book, by Christian Madsbjerg, is published in 2017.

The main argument of the book cautions on relying too much using quantifiable data to make decisions for solving complex problems. There is a need to ensure humans retain their uniqueness and ability to draw on tacit knowledge, acquired across life experiences. Machines, artificial intelligences and robots do not have the biologically sourced ability to tap into individuals’ idiosyncratically acquired knowledge, to make decisions requiring creativity and insight.

Some parts of this book do not quite work and most of the argument is well laid out and sound. Madsbjerg heads ReD Associates, a strategy consulting company which uses social researchers (anthropologists, sociologists, art historians and philosophers) to assist corporates to attain better attuned information to eventually improve their company’s reach. There is some irony in this.
Humans’ sensemaking is not just based on quantitative data. We are embodied beings. We collect, collate, evaluate and act on multi-modal inputs. All of these, end up being drawn on when we intuit insights which are sometimes at odds with what quantitative data recommends.

The five principles of sense making are detailed:
Culture – not individuals – focuses on the need to understand the socio- historical -political arena we live in. So consumer surveys based on surveys of individuals, requires reading within the larger social framework various consumers spent their lives in.
Thick data – not just thin data – uses George Soros, at the time of the early 1990s as a case study to unpack the need for data beyond what is provided by formal means. That is, the data coming from individual’s life experiences combined with collaborations with each other. Therefore, the socio-cultural. Understanding not only the numbers, but how the individuals who make decisions (politicians, bureaucrats etc.) make decisions which in turn affect entire country and world economies.
The savannah – not the zoo – again brings in the need to see the big picture beyond data streams. Heidigger’s concept of ‘being in the world’ is used as the main framework in this chapter to explain the importance of a thing and understanding its position in the world.
Creativity – not manufacturing – encourages the need to not just make something for its own sake, but to make it well. In essence, this chapter argues for the need to adopt precepts of craftsmanship, although the word ‘craftsmanship’ is not used. In particular, this chapter critiques the move in many corporations to ‘design thinking’.
The North Star – not the GPS - uses three stories to support the need for human input into meeting complex goals. How a facilitator draws on her finely honed EQ to get the most out of participants when they are in workshops to improve their ‘managing’. The need of a negotiator who works in international hostage crisis to understand deeply, the ethos and culture of his adversaries. The embodied understanding of a winemaker, at one with the terroir, working towards making the best wine from the grapes she grows.


Overall, the book advocates for the need to better appreciate what humans bring to the world. Machines are constructed and developed by humans. They should be tools, not oracles. Education, especially a humanities-based education, assists humans to better understand the diversity, complexity and challenges inherent in our world. Technological innovations require balancing with the needs of humanity. Our lives maybe enriched and enhanced by technological tools, but in the end, humans are here to make a difference - not all of which can be measurable.

Tuesday, June 06, 2017

The meaning of work - article summary

Here is an article discussing the need to rethink the meaning of work. The article was originally written in Dutch by Rutger Bregman and the translated English version is on the World Economic Forum webpage. The article may be read as a promotion for Bregman's book - Utopia for realist: How we can build the ideal world.

The paragraph on 'what is work' is worth looking through. In short, many highly paid and usually sought after jobs do not stack up as being fulfilling, interesting of worthwhile!! In large surveys carried out recently, over 70% of the respondents - who are consultants, bankers, managers etc. do no like their jobs and / or think their jobs are useless. All in, a really worrying statistic.

Then, only work which pay money are deemed to be count towards GDP. This is not a new concept. In the 1980s, my emergent interest in finding more about the world found me reading the book - Counting for Nothing - by Marilyn Waring - now a Professor at Auckland Institute of Technology. This book set me on the path I now walk - one in which it is important to question expectations and look beyond the norm. The book also influenced by nascent inquiries into feminism, sustainability and the need for individuals to take responsibility and to play a role - no matter how small - in trying to ensure we leave the world a better place for others who will follow us.

The article then sets up an argument for a universal basic income - UBI - similar in slant to the investigations taken up by the NZ Labour party and summarised in recent blog. The byline at the end of the article is apt - jobs for robots and life is for people.





Monday, May 29, 2017

Future of Jobs and Jobs training - Pew report, OxfordMartin report,McKinsey report, bbc article

A collection of reports etc. read over the last few weeks on the future of work, education and impact on jobs.

First up, via Jane Hart's Modern Learning in the Workplace newletter, the Pew report on the future of jobs and jobs training.
The report is a longish read covering a range of concepts across 8 webpages. The overview on page one, introduces the challenges and discusses implications. The FIVE main themes are introduced and following pages expand on each. The themes are:
- Training ecosystems will evolve, with a mix of innovation in all education formats.
- Learners must cultivate 21st century skills, capabilities and attributes.
- New credentialing systems will arise as self-directed learning expands.
- Training and learning systems will NOT meet 21st century needs by 2026.
- Job? what jobs? Technological forces will fundamentally change work and the economic landscape.

Second, a report from the oxfordmartin group, on the future of employment, which is the source of the much quoted statistic on number of jobs that will be replaced by technology. The report tries to identify which jobs may be at risk. There is a  a good overview of how far computing has come and the progress made towards computerising non-routine cognitive tasks. The study identifies social intelligence, creativity and perception / manipulation as classes of algorithms able to replace humans in roles.
""The model predicts that most workers in transportation and logistics occupations, together with the bulk of office and administrative support workers, and labour in production occupations, are at risk.
a substantial share of employment in service occupations, where most US job growth has occurred over the past decades (Autor and Dorn, 44 2013), are highly susceptible to computerisation.
Therefore, for workers to win the race, however, they will have to acquire creative and social skills.""

The third report is from McKinsey on technology jobs and the future of work. 60% of jobs will have 30% of activities that can be technically automatable. Highly skilled workers working with technology will benefit. Low skilled workers working with technology may experience wage pressure as there will be less demand for these occupations.

Lastly, a good overview via the BBC on how automation will affect you, summarising opinions from a range of experts on the topic. As always, the solution is education.  In the near future, people will have to put in 60% of their time working and  40% of time in learning. Fewer than 5% of jobs can be automated with existing technology but 60% of occupations could see up to 30% of tasks being done by machines. Robots should complement, not replace you. We need to learn how to work alongside robots. There will be an accompanying increase in demand for creative, social, interpersonal skills. 

All studies point to the importance of educational systems in preparing and re-training / re-skilling people.


Monday, May 22, 2017

Inge de Waard's blog

I bumped into Inge de Waard at several mlearning conferences in the past. The last one at least six years ago. Time flies! At that time, she had just started the PhD journey and has now just completed her viva.

Inge's blog - @IgnatiaWebs - has been a good way to keep in touch with happenings in the mlearning research scene. Especially since I have had to put my energies into vocational education research with mlearning as an adjunct.

Her posts always lead to extra exploration of various concepts, resources and the work of other leaders in the field. So, a good 'go to' place for updates and to keep up with the ever changing mlearning scene.

One of the real gems with technology focused blogs, is the historical recording of how various types of technology evolve. In the case of @ignatiaWebs, the history of mlearning is archived. Mainly due to the Inge keeping a focus on the topic. She posts strategically with posts around here various presentations and publications as well.

So, always something to learn from others. This blog meanders across several topics as my research interests shifts horizontally across 'learning a trade' type topics. I need to start putting up overviews of recent presentations and publications as well. Something I will start doing this year.








Monday, May 15, 2017

Academic Study Leave presentations - Ara Institute of Technology - May 2017

Notes taken on the reports from Ara staff on their 2016 ASL. This 'sabbatical' is used in various ways by staff . Some update their discipline specific pedagogical understandings, others complete their PhDs or other research projects. I enjoy listening to the range of reports, encapsulating what makes Ara an interesting place to work. Our staff bring much passion into their work and ASL presentations provide a window of opportunity to 'see into' their professional lives. 

4/5
Adrian Blunt – teaching maths –
Listed the various activities undertaken and his learnings from each. Was grateful for the opportunity as he had never, in all his teaching career, been able to put time into reflecting on his practice, work on resources informed by the latest findings on how people attain a ‘mathematical mindset’ and compare / evaluate how other institutions teach or embed maths or numeracy into programmes.
Recommended the book – mathematical mindsets by JoBoaler as required reading for all maths teachers.
Undertook to doing all the exercises required in engineering programmes and engaged – electrical trades - to strengthen his skills in ensuring maths teaching and support was ‘authentic’.
Developed short videos, socrative quizzes, testmoz to support his teaching.
Updated on current ideas, strategies and resources in teaching numeracy and mathematics in the UK.
Classroom learning in schools – back to traditional. No real embedding in FE sector as students attend Maths / English classes outside of discipline studies. OFSTED requires ‘progress for ALL students’.

Anna Richardson from Nursing
Recommended to pre-plan well before starting to garner the most benefit from ASL.
Met with nurse leaders in UK, Canada and US of A. presented at all of these places, largely with undergraduate students. Topics varied but matched to Anna’s research interest and the NZ context.
Completed 2 publications.
Reported on meetings with the institutions to learn how they approached the teaching of nursing. Provided examples of the use of simulations in nursing. Findings inform curriculum review at Ara.
Proposed possibility of aiming for setting up a centre of excellence in NZ family nursing at Ara.

Marg Hughes from nursing
Completed writing up of PhD while on ASL and just about to complete vivo. Shared an overview of the methods and findings from her thesis – How do registered (RN) and enrolled nurses (EN) communicate within the delegation and direction relationship.
Summarised rationale and background for the project. For over 30 years, RN only workforce but ENs reintroduced in 2000s. Described and defended choice of narrative inquiry as the methodology. Shared findings with ENs showing understanding of their responsibilities but RNs struggling with aspects of delegation and direction.

9/5
Social work and community development in post-earthquake Chch. Schools – part of her PhD thesis which is in progress and submitted by end of 2017.
Provided the contexts with focus on social workers based in low SES. Numbers of social workers in this scheme were increased after earthquakes to middle SES along with 3 funded by Red Cross for higher SES. How would social workers contribute to assisting in the post-earthquake recovery process and how did their practice shape the schools.
Rationalised and explained the discourse analysis process as research process.
Two major discourses – community as recovery (encouraging of community self-help but target vulnerable groups) and community hub (schools as significant places of belonging).
Therefore, important to offer spaces for alternate community practices e.g. channelling kids who are disruptive into community work to increased self-esteem, awareness and confidence.

Rural midwifery practice in NZ and Scotland: a collaborative study.
Provided the background, evolution, contexts and challenges on the project involving, Ara, AUT, University of West of Scotland and Robert Gordon University.
Presented similarities between both countries.
Overview of the ASL and need to align research process to the requirements of the ASL. For example, obtaining ethics approval across two countries and large number of health boards took much longer than planned.
Summarised the various data collection tools and processes. Findings on joys and challenges of working in rural midwifery practice. Collated perspectives on what was required to become a midwife – skills, qualities and professional expertise – with emphasis on ‘courage’ / fortitude, preparedness, resourcefulness and the development of relationships. To prepare midwives for rural practice important through rural midwifery placements for students, developing confidence to practice autonomously, having rural specific education in the under-grad programme so continued numbers of midwives able to undertake practice.

11/5
Effectiveness of a newly developed Masters pathway for RNs
Overview of how ASL was structured around teaching and admin commitments for 2016. Planned to use ASL to develop up to 4 projects related to the new Masters pathway into becoming RNs. Students exit in 2 years with masters at University of Canterbury and a Bachelor of Nursing with opportunity to sit for nursing registration exams.
All 4 projects now approved. Provided overviews of all the projects.
1)       Demographic characteristics – why they enrolled and students’ rationale for a change of career and intentions for going forward. Project involves collaborative team between UC and Ara.
2)       Men in nursing – qualitative approach – specifically why men select Masters vs traditional programme and reasons for selection of nursing as future career. Has underlying objective to build research capability with Ara staff. Two key themes – in search of a satisfying career / answering a calling? and ‘the time is right’.
3)       Investigating perspectives from key stakeholders (key drivers, challenges and risks) on the programme – was is right, viable, fit into current challenges. Small UC and Ara team using a historical case-study approach.
4)       Career progression – longitudinal study of 5 cohorts from 2017 to 2020 – critical analysis of RNs on career planning, commitment and satisfaction.

Sustainable housing for the elderly
Investigated the homestar and lifemark ‘tools’ used to rate housing with regards to environmental and energy efficiency (homestar) and intelligent design rating (lifemark) improving usability, safety and access.
Housing options for older people summarised – staying put, adaptation, sheltered or retirement housing, retirement villages and care homes. Studied the first 3 option as ‘aging in place’ seen as advantageous.
Summarised the tools as compared to NZ standards and explained how the rating systems work and what criteria used.
Overviewed application of this learning to teaching practice.
www.superhome.co.nz - visits in May 2017 to homes build to sustainability principles.

12/5
Dr. Michael Edmond’s presentation - not on ASL but a staff sharing session also open to students. Michael provides his take on "how to to be happy at Ara"

Described his interest on ‘eudaimona’ – how humans flourish which informs this presentation.
Presentation shares his journey and how the interest informs his work as an academic, scholar and Head of School
Covered neuroscience underpinnings of how we reason and the role of emotions – do we actually have control?
A successful or happy life is about how we take control of what we do and how we perceive the world.
Summarised the range of Western philosophy informing present understandings. Free will is a key to how individuals cope with things they may not have any power to change. Therefore in life, “you cannot control the wind, but you can adjust your sails”.
So question – does this really matter? And find meaning / purpose – why are you here? What can be done to make a contribution? What is important?
Begin with asking – what are your core values? Is what you now do, aligned to these values?
Reassess these core values regularly and also forecast 5 to 10 years ahead. Offered participants the opportunity to work further on these next Friday.
Shared several examples as to how individual action may be ‘diverted’ e.g. bystander effect, social protocols, deference to authority.
Provided some evidenced-based ways to influence others – reason, inspire, ask questions, compliments, reciprocal negotiation, favour via social capital, peer pressure, authority and force! Reiterated the importance of the power of language and the concepts of word bombs, hot buttons and triggers.
Need to be empathetic and be kind J
Provide examples of experiences with having challenging conversations. Structured approach works better. If raising an issue, focus on a solution, own the problem, be specific, understand their perspective, negotiate a solution – be genuine.
Summarised his understanding of effective learning. Encouraged the ‘growth mindset’ approach. Motivation is important. Effectiveness is improved with better learning to learn skills. Provided study skill tips for students.